24 December 2012

Which #Hashtag is Right For Me, Revisited


twitter-follow-us


Way back in June, I posted about Twitter hashtags ( # ) , and which were being used the most by the online genealogical community. I used the website HashTracking to compile some data. Six months later, give or take, I would like to revisit this information, to see where we are, and what might have changed.

The data from both June and December are the number of tweets generated within a 24 hour period.
June: 11 Jun 2012, 4:10pm MST.
December: Friday, 21 Dec 2012 at 8:47pm MST.


June Tweets Retweets Mentions December Tweets Retweets Metions
#genealogy 35 89 21 #genealogy 348 40 8
#familyhistory 98 26 7 #familyhistory 59 17 2
#ancestry 28 2 0 #ancestry 94 4 0
#history 829 552 119 #history 947 266 54
#socialmedia 1194 269 37 #socialmedia 1279 189 19
#archives 187 81 4 #archives 257 218 8
#familytree 25 9 2


Although I did not document this in June, for this month’s query, the 396 #genealogy tweets generated 1,929,435 impressions reaching an audience of 248,540 followers. Not bad!

Also, I added #familytree for December’s statistics.

Look at the difference in numbers on #archives. This hashtag has had the largest fluctuation by far. In 24 hours, it has had an almost even 50/50 split between original tweets and retweets; meaning that almost every tweet that was sent that included #archives got retweeted.

#familyhistory is stagnant, but #ancestry has seen some growth in usage. #genealogy has had the most growth since June. Notice there has been a reduction in the #history retweets.

The initial evaluation was done because of a question posed on Google+ by Mariann Pierre-Louis, when she wrote:


"Question for all you social media friends out there: Have any of you ever done a study to determine which Twitter keywords have strong, loyal followings and which keywords seem to remain rapid fire and random without a core group? Just wondering..."

Conversation that followed after my original post was regarding specific hashtags that other people use in the genealogy community. And the question is still valid: what do you use regularly that is not  on the list above?  I think we all use local tags, for example #Colorado, but is there a “category” style that you use to get your message across to a specific audience in the genealogy community?